Guest Post: Six Local Writing Centers and Events By Artemis Savory

My friend and critique partner, Artemis Savory, compiled a list of writing centers and events in the New England area and asked me to share it on this blog. If you are local and interested in writing, these events are definitely worth checking out! 

DSC_0723.jpg

Like dogs, writers need to get away from the humans and just play with each other.

 

Six Local Writing Centers and Events

By Artemis Savory

  1. (Writing Center) Grubstreet is a truly amazing place for writers. They offer classes, workshops, and free brown bag lunch and Happy Hour Writing sessions. In fact, this month on Friday, September 29th they have an evening writing session—for free! They have another next month. In the heart of Boston, getting there can be a little tricky for us out-of-towners, and the parking garage isn’t cheap, although I think you get a discount if you are going to Grubstreet events. They also run the amazing Muse & The Marketplace. https://grubstreet.org/findaclass/#/events
  2. (Event) Muse & The Marketplace is a fantastic weekend event taking place in this really tiny, but beautiful hotel in Boston. Run by Grubstreet, the workshops are interesting and everyone is extremely kind and understanding. It’s expensive, but if you’re a volunteering kind of person, you could work your way in if you play your cards right. This is definitely a great place to learn more about writing, meet other writers, and pick up further inspiration from people who are going through similar things that you might be. Next year it runs April 6-8. http://museandthemarketplace.com/
  3. (Event) Boston Book Festival is a free event happening on Oct. 28th in Copley Square. I’ve only been to one of their classes, and it was really more of an author discussion about writing YA books. It was interesting, if very full with people, and the Boston Public Library was breathtaking. There is food and lots of booths at this event, as well as discussions and I’m assuming signings. My favorite part of this event is the booths, where you can chat with other writers and learn about all the writing- and reading-related things happening in our area. https://bostonbookfest.org/
  4. (Event) Arisia takes place every January, and this year it’s January 12-15 in Boston. The entry fee is not a lot (it’s usually around $60 for the whole weekend) and the offerings vary from dancing (blues, fusion, swing, etc.), to writing classes, to geeky classes about Star Wars and how things work, to making your own costumes and more. It’s an amazing place filled with creatives—there is no way that you will ever suffer writer’s block at Arisia, although you might be so busy taking notes or socializing that you’ll never get really anything done. http://www.arisia.org/
  5. (Writing Center) New Hampshire Writers’ Project sounds like a really awesome place. They have a ton of writing groups and workshops, and they also have writer meet-ups on the first Monday of every month in various towns throughout New Hampshire: Portsmouth, Derry, Concord, Nashua, and more. They have a calendar that is up-to-date and looks very official. I’m really excited to engage in some of their events and start getting to know other local writers. http://www.nhwritersproject.org/content/events-0
  6. (Writing Center) International Women’s Writing Guild sounds like they’re in western Mass, but offer some retreats and workshops throughout the country—in New Mexico, Niagara Falls, New York and beyond. They seem to have day-long as well as week-long courses and workshops, and some of the offerings aren’t wicked expensive. On April 28th they’re having a “Boston Writing from your Life Retreat” with workshops in Metrowest, Ma. I have no idea how much it costs, but it’s worth looking into, and it sounds like one day, so it shouldn’t cost too much…I hope. http://www.iwwg.org/events/
Advertisements

English Adjunct — Sara Codair

I was interviewed about my day job on my friends blog. The interview was done by audio and what you see in the blog is an abridged transcription. Check it out!

Artemis Savory

As we begin our interview, Sara skims through her sliding phone. Taps her fingers on her laptop. We are sitting in her large screened-in porch by the lake in Merrimac, Ma. It is mid-August. She is wearing a black T-shirt that reads: “I stand with standing rock.” Her hair is cut in a cross between a pixie and a bob and there are a pair of new tortoise shell glasses resting on the bridge of her nose. Sara is an adjunct, and this semester she’ll be teaching 2 classes, tutoring for 20 hours a week, and proctoring exams wherever necessary.

The one I make money at. That would be working at Northern Essex Community College, and I do a lot of different things there. I teach writing classes, I tutor in their writing center, and I help out in the testing center by proctoring and scoring the tests…

View original post 1,145 more words

Book Review: Phaethon

PhaethonPhaethon by Rachel Sharp

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

From Holly Black to Jim Butcher, I read a lot of books that involve Faeries of one kind or another. Still, this one felt fresh. It had the folklore grounding of a Holly Black novel, but a tone and humor more likely to appeal to Butcher fan’s.

The characters were cute and believable – people I could picture myself being friends with.

The plot was fast paced, and for the most part, I was able to suspend my disbelief and enjoy the ride.

As far as flaws go, sometimes things seemed a little too easy. I laughed a little when one of the characters said humans were fixing Earth, but reminded myself that the political climate may have been more…optimistic…when this book began.

The rest of the story was fun and well thought out, so I can forgive those flaws.

If you like a good blend of science and fantasy, then you will enjoy Phaethon.

View all my reviews

Bailing Boats and Books

Yesterday, as rain poured out of cumulonimbus, thunder rumbled, and lightening compensated for a lack of sunlight, I realized my bilge pump wasn’t working.

I spent the morning indoors, editing, tweeting, and exchanging feedback on #preDV tweets. When the rain let up and I went outside, there was about a foot of water in my old Boston Whaler.20170906_164649

Swamped boat + broken bilge pump +broken hand pump = bailing boat out with a bucket.

Bailing a boat with a bucket is tedious. You scoop the bucket, dump it out, and repeat.

After the first few dumps, the water level hadn’t changed. I was damp. The dog had slid off the dock while barking at ducks and was staring at me, all scruffy, wet and smelly. I couldn’t tell if he was going to jump on me or back in the lake. I wanted to chuck the bucket out to the water.

DSC_0835.jpg

I took a deep breath, tied the dog to his run in the yard, away from the dock and the lake, and then I went back to bailing.

Eventually, I did notice the water level going down. Before I knew it, there wasn’t enough water left to scoop with my bucket. The boat was as empty as it was going to get.

After the first few tries, I wanted to give up, but I kept going even though it was damp, cold and I was being eaten alive by bugs, and eventually, I achieved my goal.

This isn’t the first time I’ve had to bail this boat out by hand, and I doubt it will be the last. Every time it happens, it makes me think of my barely existent writing career.

Whenever I start a new book, I feel like I am never going to finish it. I switch back and forth from being super excited to so overwhelmed I want to chuck my draft across the lake, but I don’t chuck the draft. I keep writing.

This cycle of excitement, frustration and despair repeats through each revision and edit, but I always keep going, and I always finish the damned the book.

The same goes for publishing the book. Right now, I’m in the despair phase. One novel has gotten about 110 agent rejections and a handful from small publishers too. However, whenever I seriously feel like scrapping it, I think of the boat.

No matter how much rain gets in it, and no matter how broken it is, I never let it sink. I bail it out, and make sure what is broken gets fixed, usually via unspoken trade offs with my dad (i.e. pet sitting in exchange for replacing my spark plugs). Afterwards, when I’m speeding across the lake feeling the wind blow what’s left of my hair, I know it was worth the hard work.

The same goes for my books. I’ll keep writing. I’ll keep revising. I’ll keep submitting.

I’m not one of the those fluke success stories who gets their first book agented and published right away, but I will get published, and eventually, I will get agented, and published by bigger houses that get can my books to more people.

I will never let my writing career sink.

DSC_0843.JPG

A Review of Wings Unseen

Wings UnseenWings Unseen by Rebecca Gomez Farrell

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I received an early copy from NetGalley for a fair, honest, review.

Wings Unseen got off to a slow start with a first chapter that almost made me put the book down. However, I am glad I kept reading. I loved watching how a character that repulsed me on the first page transformed into someone I was rooting for, and she was just one of many fascinating characters.

Characters were one of many things I liked about this book.

The juxtaposition of two opposite realms was a fascinating way to explore gender roles, the relationship between the people and the government, and what people can come to accept as normal.

The world was exquisitely developed and describe with language that was beautiful and readable.

Once I got past the first quarter of the book, the pace picked up and suspense made me want to keep reading. The romance subplot was not what I expected, and near the middle of the book, when combined with the pacing the way the writer alternated between pov’s, made me want to cry, yell, or throw the book across the room.

Even though I wanted the characters to take different paths, but the end, the author convinced me they had made the right choice, and the emotions I experienced mid book were probably just a smidgen of what the characters would feel were this real.

Overall, it was worth read, and I would reccomend it to anyone who likes epic fantasy and has patience for a book that burns slowly.

View all my reviews

Professional Reader